INTERVIEW W// Erik Lindman



Over the past two years, I’ve begun to make sculptures –– in part as a very natural extension of my painting practice, which from the beginning has involved the incorporation of found material. Unlike the paintings, which zeroed in on an apparently fixed viewpoint of a found surface, these sculptural explorations embodied a plurality of sequential views around a form.

I had to discover new materials to use in making these sculptures –– primarily epoxy resin putties and pastes –– which I use to embalm these found forms. I’ve always eschewed hands-off fabrication, and believed that using a limited range of materials would allow for a more inventive artist response, freed from the paralysis of choice. But perhaps being able to use the epoxy resin in a way that didn’t feel novel allowed for me to be more receptive to using other materials in my paintings, specifically acrylic paints.

I had to discover new materials to use in making these sculptures –– primarily epoxy resin putties and pastes –– which I use to embalm these found forms. I’ve always eschewed hands-off fabrication, and believed that using a limited range of materials would allow for a more inventive artist response, freed from the paralysis of choice. But perhaps being able to use the epoxy resin in a way that didn’t feel novel allowed for me to be more receptive to using other materials in my paintings, specifically acrylic paints.


Paintings made using acrylic –– which will comprise the majority of my show, “Fal/Parsi” at Peter Blum Gallery in New York allowed for many different physical possibilities that oil painting didn’t permit, such as the embedding of new collaged elements inside and on top of dried paint films. This plasticity upended a lot of the decision making intrinsic to how my recent paintings have unfolded.


And as these developing sculptures existed in a physical space, I found my paintings became more pliant and leaned more into a shallow visual space than a reliance on the hard physical surfaces present in my earlier paintings.


Even the simple act of buying new acrylic paints –– which I had never seriously done before–– gave me the chance to buy colors with an intention that was informed by the knowledge of paint making I have today instead of again reaching into my old milk crate of oil paints, where there are tubes I may have had since college and had bought without knowing they were for or why I was using them and this new set of tools has allowed for a much wider range of color to show itself in these new paintings.

No, I would say all my paintings are open-ended, and that I have a similar approach to grouping

work for a show. That’s not to say there isn’t a long process of consideration to both –– take my drawings for instance –– I’m always drawing, and drawing certainly informs my paintings but my paintings are never enlargements of a specific drawing. Or, I’ll take something I learned from one painting and allow it to germinate in the next work, and if an interesting thread is caught between these two paintings I’d say they would likely fall together in dialogue in a show, helping each other to point towards something for the viewer.


For “Fal/Parsi”, I’ve made a foam-core model of Peter Blum’s Grand Street gallery’s space and have spend a lot of time arranging and rearranging the hanging of the paintings and mocking up where I plan to build a wall in the space. Despite this planning, I wouldn’t say I’ve ever made a show with the ntention of illustrating a specific idea or thesis: if anything, I’d say a successful show would feel like a resting point on a much longer road.

No, I would say all my paintings are open-ended, and that I have a similar approach to grouping work for a show. That’s not to say there isn’t a long process of consideration to both –– take my drawings for instance –– I’m always drawing, and drawing certainly informs my paintings but my paintings are never enlargements of a specific drawing. Or, I’ll take something I learned from one painting and allow it to germinate in the next work, and if an interesting thread is caught between these two paintings I’d say they would likely fall together in dialogue in a show, helping each other to point towards something for the viewer.


For “Fal/Parsi”, I’ve made a foam-core model of Peter Blum’s Grand Street gallery’s space and have spend a lot of time arranging and rearranging the hanging of the paintings and mocking up where I plan to build a wall in the space. Despite this planning, I wouldn’t say I’ve ever made a show with the ntention of illustrating a specific idea or thesis: if anything, I’d say a successful show would feel like a resting point on a much longer road.


For what it's worth.

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